Royalty Free Afro Loops Samples Sounds

Loops 1 - 25 of 34

Description : Made in FL12. Always nice to listen what you guys do with my drums.
Description : In part with my twangy soft guitar loop
Description : Sample bass fusion afro ,Know that all my bass, are recorded in direct raw, directly in a RC 505 Boss. Let me know in the comments if you use my loops
Description : oh come on, afro thats too much
Description : afro pls what you doin to me
Description : holy afro
Description : some afro type jungle 808..its really wild and untamed so be careful ye? Leave comments with links to your work please.Bless Up
Description : Acoustic toms and kick drum samples i designed in Studio One...
Description : Acoustic toms and kick drum samples i designed in Studio One...
Description : 4 seamless bars of an upbeat Afro-Cuban cha-cha-cha rhythm in the classic 1950's style. cf. a recording like Rosemary Clooney-Perez Prado's "In A Little Spanish Town" (1951)
Description : 8 seamless bars of an Afro-Cuban ensemble playing a 1950's-style Mambo beat.
Description : this one's got a nice afro pop vibe to it. would love to hear what yall come up with!
Description : The same fast funky Afro Conga groove as before, but this time with some crazy-loud group claps on the backbeats.
Description : 8 bars of a fast African-flavored funk groove played on the conga drums. Some subtle FX added to enhance the grooviness.
Description : Here is 8 seamless bars of a basic Afro-Cuban Cha-Cha-Cha rhythm as performed by a typical Latin percussion ensemble.
Description : HOUSE DANCE AFRO LATIN
Description : Live drum
Description : While the site was being updated I started to learn to play the cajon drum. Here is an explanation of this groovy box drum. The cajón is the most widely used Afro-Peruvian musical instrument since the late 18th century. Slaves of west and central African origin in the Americas, specifically Peru, are considered to be the source of the cajón drum; though the instrument is common in musical performance throughout the Americas. The cajón was most likely developed in coastal Peru during the early 19th century or before,[1] where it is associated with several Afro-Peruvian genres. The instrument reached a peak in popularity by 1850, and by the end of the 19th century cajón players were experimenting with the design of the instrument by bending some of the planks in the cajón's body to alter the instrument's patterns of sound vibration.
Description : While the site was being updated I started to learn to play the cajon drum. Here is an explanation of this groovy box drum. The cajón is the most widely used Afro-Peruvian musical instrument since the late 18th century. Slaves of west and central African origin in the Americas, specifically Peru, are considered to be the source of the cajón drum; though the instrument is common in musical performance throughout the Americas. The cajón was most likely developed in coastal Peru during the early 19th century or before,[1] where it is associated with several Afro-Peruvian genres. The instrument reached a peak in popularity by 1850, and by the end of the 19th century cajón players were experimenting with the design of the instrument by bending some of the planks in the cajón's body to alter the instrument's patterns of sound vibration.
Description : While the site was being updated I started to learn to play the cajon drum. Here is an explanation of this groovy box drum. The cajón is the most widely used Afro-Peruvian musical instrument since the late 18th century. Slaves of west and central African origin in the Americas, specifically Peru, are considered to be the source of the cajón drum; though the instrument is common in musical performance throughout the Americas. The cajón was most likely developed in coastal Peru during the early 19th century or before,[1] where it is associated with several Afro-Peruvian genres. The instrument reached a peak in popularity by 1850, and by the end of the 19th century cajón players were experimenting with the design of the instrument by bending some of the planks in the cajón's body to alter the instrument's patterns of sound vibration.
Description : While the site was being updated I started to learn to play the cajon drum. Here is an explanation of this groovy box drum. The cajón is the most widely used Afro-Peruvian musical instrument since the late 18th century. Slaves of west and central African origin in the Americas, specifically Peru, are considered to be the source of the cajón drum; though the instrument is common in musical performance throughout the Americas. The cajón was most likely developed in coastal Peru during the early 19th century or before,[1] where it is associated with several Afro-Peruvian genres. The instrument reached a peak in popularity by 1850, and by the end of the 19th century cajón players were experimenting with the design of the instrument by bending some of the planks in the cajón's body to alter the instrument's patterns of sound vibration.
Description : While the site was being updated I started to learn to play the cajon drum. Here is an explanation of this groovy box drum. The cajón is the most widely used Afro-Peruvian musical instrument since the late 18th century. Slaves of west and central African origin in the Americas, specifically Peru, are considered to be the source of the cajón drum; though the instrument is common in musical performance throughout the Americas. The cajón was most likely developed in coastal Peru during the early 19th century or before,[1] where it is associated with several Afro-Peruvian genres. The instrument reached a peak in popularity by 1850, and by the end of the 19th century cajón players were experimenting with the design of the instrument by bending some of the planks in the cajón's body to alter the instrument's patterns of sound vibration.
Description : While the site was being updated I started to learn to play the cajon drum. Here is an explanation of this groovy box drum. The cajón is the most widely used Afro-Peruvian musical instrument since the late 18th century. Slaves of west and central African origin in the Americas, specifically Peru, are considered to be the source of the cajón drum; though the instrument is common in musical performance throughout the Americas. The cajón was most likely developed in coastal Peru during the early 19th century or before,[1] where it is associated with several Afro-Peruvian genres. The instrument reached a peak in popularity by 1850, and by the end of the 19th century cajón players were experimenting with the design of the instrument by bending some of the planks in the cajón's body to alter the instrument's patterns of sound vibration.
Description : While the site was being updated I started to learn to play the cajon drum. Here is an explanation of this groovy box drum. The cajón is the most widely used Afro-Peruvian musical instrument since the late 18th century. Slaves of west and central African origin in the Americas, specifically Peru, are considered to be the source of the cajón drum; though the instrument is common in musical performance throughout the Americas. The cajón was most likely developed in coastal Peru during the early 19th century or before,[1] where it is associated with several Afro-Peruvian genres. The instrument reached a peak in popularity by 1850, and by the end of the 19th century cajón players were experimenting with the design of the instrument by bending some of the planks in the cajón's body to alter the instrument's patterns of sound vibration.
Description : While the site was being updated I started to learn to play the cajon drum. Here is an explanation of this groovy box drum. The cajón is the most widely used Afro-Peruvian musical instrument since the late 18th century. Slaves of west and central African origin in the Americas, specifically Peru, are considered to be the source of the cajón drum; though the instrument is common in musical performance throughout the Americas. The cajón was most likely developed in coastal Peru during the early 19th century or before,[1] where it is associated with several Afro-Peruvian genres. The instrument reached a peak in popularity by 1850, and by the end of the 19th century cajón players were experimenting with the design of the instrument by bending some of the planks in the cajón's body to alter the instrument's patterns of sound vibration.
Loops 1 - 25 of 34
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