Royalty Free African Loops Samples Sounds

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Loops 51 - 75 of 98

Description : African djembe drum loops created for most styles of psytrance.

Description : 8 bars of a fast African-flavored funk groove played on the conga drums. Some subtle FX added to enhance the grooviness.

Description : Here is 2 seamless bars of a group drumming circle riff, doing a Sunu-type West African rhythm on Djembe drums (I'm using congas here instead). Do note that this groove is in 6/8 meter. I have plumped up the bass drums with sub-bass frequencies for added weight.

Description : If you have used this loop please let me hear what you've done with it. Thanks!

Description : If you have used this loop, I'd love to hear it in action. Thanks

Description : African Moroccan Gnawa beat

Description : If you use this loop, please leave a comment with a link to your song here.

Description : Someone will call this ethnic drums, but i used house drums and "african drums"

Description : Percussion with vocals.

Description : Percussion with vocals.

Description : Same African kit as before but spruced up with enhance bass kicks and snares and general dub sounds. Made using Logic.

Description : Some african sounding drum sounds made into a sort of hip hop sound. A nice, simple sound. Made using Logic.

Description : As in the title - the drum kick has a sort of african twang to it. I don't really know how I achieved that - probably by accident. I also use some interesting trail effects on the snare.

Description : While the site was being updated I started to learn to play the cajon drum. Here is an explanation of this groovy box drum.
The cajón is the most widely used Afro-Peruvian musical instrument since the late 18th century.
Slaves of west and central African origin in the Americas, specifically Peru, are considered to be the source of the cajón drum; though the instrument is common in musical performance throughout the Americas.
The cajón was most likely developed in coastal Peru during the early 19th century or before,[1] where it is associated with several Afro-Peruvian genres. The instrument reached a peak in popularity by 1850, and by the end of the 19th century cajón players were experimenting with the design of the instrument by bending some of the planks in the cajón's body to alter the instrument's patterns of sound vibration.

Description : While the site was being updated I started to learn to play the cajon drum. Here is an explanation of this groovy box drum.
The cajón is the most widely used Afro-Peruvian musical instrument since the late 18th century.
Slaves of west and central African origin in the Americas, specifically Peru, are considered to be the source of the cajón drum; though the instrument is common in musical performance throughout the Americas.
The cajón was most likely developed in coastal Peru during the early 19th century or before,[1] where it is associated with several Afro-Peruvian genres. The instrument reached a peak in popularity by 1850, and by the end of the 19th century cajón players were experimenting with the design of the instrument by bending some of the planks in the cajón's body to alter the instrument's patterns of sound vibration.

Description : While the site was being updated I started to learn to play the cajon drum. Here is an explanation of this groovy box drum.
The cajón is the most widely used Afro-Peruvian musical instrument since the late 18th century.
Slaves of west and central African origin in the Americas, specifically Peru, are considered to be the source of the cajón drum; though the instrument is common in musical performance throughout the Americas.
The cajón was most likely developed in coastal Peru during the early 19th century or before,[1] where it is associated with several Afro-Peruvian genres. The instrument reached a peak in popularity by 1850, and by the end of the 19th century cajón players were experimenting with the design of the instrument by bending some of the planks in the cajón's body to alter the instrument's patterns of sound vibration.

Description : While the site was being updated I started to learn to play the cajon drum. Here is an explanation of this groovy box drum.
The cajón is the most widely used Afro-Peruvian musical instrument since the late 18th century.
Slaves of west and central African origin in the Americas, specifically Peru, are considered to be the source of the cajón drum; though the instrument is common in musical performance throughout the Americas.
The cajón was most likely developed in coastal Peru during the early 19th century or before,[1] where it is associated with several Afro-Peruvian genres. The instrument reached a peak in popularity by 1850, and by the end of the 19th century cajón players were experimenting with the design of the instrument by bending some of the planks in the cajón's body to alter the instrument's patterns of sound vibration.

Description : While the site was being updated I started to learn to play the cajon drum. Here is an explanation of this groovy box drum.
The cajón is the most widely used Afro-Peruvian musical instrument since the late 18th century.
Slaves of west and central African origin in the Americas, specifically Peru, are considered to be the source of the cajón drum; though the instrument is common in musical performance throughout the Americas.
The cajón was most likely developed in coastal Peru during the early 19th century or before,[1] where it is associated with several Afro-Peruvian genres. The instrument reached a peak in popularity by 1850, and by the end of the 19th century cajón players were experimenting with the design of the instrument by bending some of the planks in the cajón's body to alter the instrument's patterns of sound vibration.

Description : While the site was being updated I started to learn to play the cajon drum. Here is an explanation of this groovy box drum.
The cajón is the most widely used Afro-Peruvian musical instrument since the late 18th century.
Slaves of west and central African origin in the Americas, specifically Peru, are considered to be the source of the cajón drum; though the instrument is common in musical performance throughout the Americas.
The cajón was most likely developed in coastal Peru during the early 19th century or before,[1] where it is associated with several Afro-Peruvian genres. The instrument reached a peak in popularity by 1850, and by the end of the 19th century cajón players were experimenting with the design of the instrument by bending some of the planks in the cajón's body to alter the instrument's patterns of sound vibration.

Description : While the site was being updated I started to learn to play the cajon drum. Here is an explanation of this groovy box drum.
The cajón is the most widely used Afro-Peruvian musical instrument since the late 18th century.
Slaves of west and central African origin in the Americas, specifically Peru, are considered to be the source of the cajón drum; though the instrument is common in musical performance throughout the Americas.
The cajón was most likely developed in coastal Peru during the early 19th century or before,[1] where it is associated with several Afro-Peruvian genres. The instrument reached a peak in popularity by 1850, and by the end of the 19th century cajón players were experimenting with the design of the instrument by bending some of the planks in the cajón's body to alter the instrument's patterns of sound vibration.

Description : While the site was being updated I started to learn to play the cajon drum. Here is an explanation of this groovy box drum.
The cajón is the most widely used Afro-Peruvian musical instrument since the late 18th century.
Slaves of west and central African origin in the Americas, specifically Peru, are considered to be the source of the cajón drum; though the instrument is common in musical performance throughout the Americas.
The cajón was most likely developed in coastal Peru during the early 19th century or before,[1] where it is associated with several Afro-Peruvian genres. The instrument reached a peak in popularity by 1850, and by the end of the 19th century cajón players were experimenting with the design of the instrument by bending some of the planks in the cajón's body to alter the instrument's patterns of sound vibration.

Description : While the site was being updated I started to learn to play the cajon drum. Here is an explanation of this groovy box drum.
The cajón is the most widely used Afro-Peruvian musical instrument since the late 18th century.
Slaves of west and central African origin in the Americas, specifically Peru, are considered to be the source of the cajón drum; though the instrument is common in musical performance throughout the Americas.
The cajón was most likely developed in coastal Peru during the early 19th century or before,[1] where it is associated with several Afro-Peruvian genres. The instrument reached a peak in popularity by 1850, and by the end of the 19th century cajón players were experimenting with the design of the instrument by bending some of the planks in the cajón's body to alter the instrument's patterns of sound vibration.

Description : While the site was being updated I started to learn to play the cajon drum. Here is an explanation of this groovy box drum.
The cajón is the most widely used Afro-Peruvian musical instrument since the late 18th century.
Slaves of west and central African origin in the Americas, specifically Peru, are considered to be the source of the cajón drum; though the instrument is common in musical performance throughout the Americas.
The cajón was most likely developed in coastal Peru during the early 19th century or before,[1] where it is associated with several Afro-Peruvian genres. The instrument reached a peak in popularity by 1850, and by the end of the 19th century cajón players were experimenting with the design of the instrument by bending some of the planks in the cajón's body to alter the instrument's patterns of sound vibration.

Description : African Kalimba Echoes + Little Bit Hip Hop Drums
Make with E/S Mallets in Garage Band

Description : Bongo - Percussion - Loop; You can find other cool stuff on my Looperman profile page! Hope you find this useful. If you use one of my loops in your song, I'd love to hear it :-) Thanks

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