Production Trickbook

Posts 51 - 75 of 221
  1. 165165
    Falter : Wed 31st Dec 2008 : 9 years ago i think Longfella just went into knowledge dispensing overload.
    and i like it! Good effort man.
    checked out all that stuff and its all useful so check it out.

    @ livid, thanks for takin the time to explain it properly to us thick people lol.
  2. 135245
    DaMann : Fri 2nd Jan 2009 : 9 years ago Sidechaining comes up every few months here so why not explain!

    Sidechain compression is where you use a signal to make another signal "duck" out. It is best used on pads or a basslines in Electronic Dance Music. The best thing to sidechain with is a kick. So create a chord pad sequence, or play some pads, or make a basslines. Then use a create a compressor as an fx of the bass/pads. Now we will do basic sidechaining. Create a 4 on the floor, 4 beats per measure, sequence of kick drums along with your pads/bass. Now depending on what your daw your using it will be different. In Reason what you can do is create a spider audio merger and splitter, split the kick drum into two channels, run one out to the mixer, and one to the sidechain in. I'm sure in other daws you select which channel you want to be your sidechain.

    Any question?

    -DaMann
  3. 165165
    Falter : Sat 3rd Jan 2009 : 9 years ago i'm not really sure what the sidechaining is doing? is it just compressing the sound by overpowering the other instruments?
  4. 135245
    DaMann : Sat 3rd Jan 2009 : 9 years ago It's not overpowering, but it cancels out the signal when another signal is active. Soo say we have a bass line that goes...

    baaaaaaaaaa

    Then we have a kick that goes k---k---k---

    We sidechain the bassline with the kick as the sidechain input.

    So we get...

    k---k---k---
    aaa aaa aaa

    you see?

    -DaMann
  5. 165165
    Falter : Sun 4th Jan 2009 : 9 years ago ah alright gotcha.
    didnt know that had a name lol, just thought it was me f---in up my mixing =p

    thanks for clearin that up!
    you are DaMann!
  6. 193774
    jonnyh4 : Sun 4th Jan 2009 : 9 years ago gd information :) thnx
  7. 96162
    iDude : Tue 13th Jan 2009 : 9 years ago Some recent Tricks I've been working with or have learned.

    * Vocal Tracks
    I was laying down a vocal track over a piano loop recently and wanted to shoot for a Nickleback type of vocal on top of it. So I went and did a Google Search on Nickleback and vocal effects. Wow, these guys use a lot of effects believe it or not. I managed to read one thing though, that there is a slight delay of around 100ms that's applied to Chad's voice for vocal thickening. So I loaded up a Delay Plug-in Slapped in a 100 ms setting and tweaked to around 20% wet or 80% dry. Wow, instant thickening. Does not sound like a chorus effect and it does not fight with the main vocals very much. So this trick really works and works well for making the vocals a little thicker.

    Next Vocal Track Trick..
    Again, I was reading about Nickleback vocals, compression. I decided to Load up a Graphic Band EQ plug in followed by a Compressor right after it. Basically, I use a little gain boost on the compressor and it brings out the vocals a little more, however it adds more bottom end and mids to the vocals, so I end up going back and making some EQ adjustments and tweaking of the compression ratios. I've been doing this by ear. I have found cranking up the release time helps and playing with the threshold setting to be very critical along with the compression ratio. Too much of anything and you end up hearing to much breathing noise into the vocal track and such. I tried to add a noise gate effect to not much avail. I found going back and messing with the compressor settings and Graphic Band EQ works best. What amazes me is that the settings that work best all depend upon the type of vocals and how hot the track is or is not. I hope to explore this some more.

    What I think is awesome, is that you can do a little google work, and actually read up about the gear or tricks bands are using for their sound.

    Distorted Guitar Tracks, this has been an area giving me hell for awhile now. Most of it goes back to the Quality and tone of the original track recording. What I am finding is it's best to actually listen to the sound of professional recordings and listen to the tonal range of guitar tracks. Guitars tend to be panned and seperated right and left from one another on tracks. Distored Guitars or Synths tend to add a lot of harmonic tones that blend and cover up other instruments and loops. Often require tighter filters or tight EQ's of specific allotted freq to keep them sounding seperated from the other tracks and not muddy them up so much. I'm still not an expert at this yet, but I've been starting to get better at it. I'm sharing some of the things I have discovered or learned so far.

    Compression on the over all Master Track are a bit hit and miss so far for me. I'll give it a try out along with some General Graphic Band EQing. If the track sounds better without it, I simply give up trying to use them. Compressors can mess with the Dynamics of your tracks as much as they can bring certain sounds more out to the foreground. Think it depends upon the sound and style of recording you are shooting for.

    There's a lot of hit or miss experimentation I have been doing, One thing is that I've been learning a lot more about compressors and such by simply playing with them. Doing some research into Bands and the effects other artist helps a lot as well.

    I'm no expert in the area of mixing yet. It's a bit of an art in itself. Arrangement of a track is another aspect. At times one can over arrange or under arrange a track. If you listen to your own track and hear something a bit off or not right, chances are there is a problem, or something you could do a little better or different.

    I have also under arranged a track and made it almost too boring for the ears. It all depends if you are shooting for a Banging Dance track with a steady Groove, or something that for listening pleasure only. I think a Good Solid Hook or Riff is important along with Tempo for a good dance track. The Hook can be a synth riff, a bass riff, a Drum riff or anything. The Drums and Bass are always important to a Dance Track.

    I've been working a lot more on Bass and Drum EQ'ing and trying bring the bottom end of tracks out. Perhaps too much at times now, but this has been a bit of a focus for me lately. I have many tracks that I simply play around with here at home, stuff I've not released or uploaded.

    The Best part is to simply have fun and explore things, see what you can come up with. If you have a set Genre or a style you are trying to develop do as much reading about that Genre and the techniques and tricks applied. Putting your own spin on things can be fun as well...

    Worse case, you can simply remove the plug-in's and try things over again. I often save different copies and versions of mixes I have going on. Backups just in case I make a bad turn and want to go back to a previous mix or version and start over again.

    Hope these things helps somebody a little.
  8. 165165
    Falter : Tue 13th Jan 2009 : 9 years ago just tried out those vocal tricks. good stuff works like a charm.

    nice one bro.
  9. 631823
    Mahloo13 : Tue 13th Jan 2009 : 9 years ago I almost forgot...before you start mixng down your song always calibrate the mixer.
    Every instrument is going to a separate track on the mixer so make sure that the loudest part of each instrument in part pegs on the meters of your mixer at 0db. The mixer faders must be at 0db when you do this.

    In Fl Studio you can do this by lowering or raising the volume of the instruments in your sequencer window.

    In Sonar and Cubase you have the gain/trim control on your mixer you do it from there.

    ok so....

    kick dead center remains at 0 db
    snare dead center -2db (if it interferes with the vocal pan it 10%left or right)
    HATS 30% left or right -8 to -12 db
    CRASH 50% to 100% left or right -12 to -25db(depending on the music style)
    CYMBALS 50% to 100% left or right in the other direction than the Crashes -20db to -28db(again the style of music decides)
    TOMS -6 to -10db tom1 30% left
    tom2 10% right
    tom3 50% right
    tom4 80-100% right

    toms can go the other way also

    GUITARS
    RYTHM GUITARS(Electric) hard left and right(100%) -15db
    SOLO GUITARS (ELECTRIC) mix decides panning -8 to -12db

    For acoustic guitars you can pan them about 45 maybe 50 even 60%
    left or right and then send them to a reeverb unit that has the panning ledft dead center (amazing effect)You won't need another guitar in this case

    Bass dead center -10db maybe hotter depending on the song

    Piano -8db to -15 db panning MAYBE(IF the piano is stereo the high notes should be in your right side when you listen to the mix and the lower notes in your left side ussualy C5 is the center of the piano keyboards)

    This are general settings but you may replace the instruments here with your synths and it's a good starting point for your mix.

    Always check in MONO cause due to digital effects sometimes apears an effect called phase cancelation so listen in mono and make sure you can here al your instruments (it hapens sometime and instruments or sounds just disapear from the mix).

    Also make sure your mix is centered cause panning can afect the balance of the mix and it may be right or left sided.

    Hope this helps someone! And please excuse my grammar it's kinda late here! Good luck fellas
  10. 96162
    iDude : Tue 13th Jan 2009 : 9 years ago Thanks Mahloo for the panning and general DB rules of thumb for drums. I sort of incorperated those things quickly into a basic track I was messing around with last night. That track was when I was exploring how to get Nickleback sort of effects processing on my vocals.

    I uploaded a short yet simple track working with your technique and with what I just recently posted..

    https://www.looperman.com/tracks/detail/21022

    There's an extra stereo delay effect I did not mention on this track. However it follows with the advice I gave in a previous post on this thread. To cut back on the wetness and use filters if available on your Delay Plug in. This is a stereo Delay, panned left and right. Different timing set between the left and right pans.

    What I like is that I can save effect Chain settings in ACID and reuse them again on other tracks. I saved this one as "Nickleback 1" because this is the closest description I could come up with. The Added Delay effect was my own invention without referencing any Nickleback songs. The Vocal thickening and use of compression though are things I read about when seeking out the Nickleback vocal sound. I still need to refine and work with this some more. I'm certain if I get around to add more vocals and attempt to emulate or mimic Chad's singing I might be able to get closer and closer. This is just what I was able to come up with in one evening in a matter of an hour or so. Thanks for the great post on Drums and pans and DB levels.
  11. 631823
    Mahloo13 : Tue 13th Jan 2009 : 9 years ago i think i've posted some eq settings as a reply to falter i sincerely apologize man, my bad. it was the last post before mine and i think i replied to u! Sorry man!
  12. 165165
    Falter : Wed 14th Jan 2009 : 9 years ago hey no worries. i havent recieved anythin like that so mightve just been a server error or somethin.
    good tips tho, awesome stuff it really works well.
  13. 64965
    DonnieVyros : Wed 14th Jan 2009 : 9 years ago Hey everyone,
    It's been a min since I added anything to this and I don't think what I wanna discuss has been added already. So here we go...

    Stemming from the tread, Want it to sound vinyl?. I thought of something I could share with all of you...

    Record player-like mixing on a DAW:
    1.) Start your program and open a new file.
    2.) Load a loop/sample/song onto the sequence board.
    Crossfade-like gapping-
    3.) At the end of 1 loop drag the sound level line a little back (to about the middle of the last spike in the wave form).
    4.) No do the same thing for the beginning of the next loop (either in the middle or right at the start of the wave form's spike).
    (this little gap will make it sound as if you're cutting out and back in really quick like the DJs do).
    Pronounced transition fades-
    5.) If you are jumping back & forth between songs it helps to gradually slide from one to the other. So take the ending loop/section of one and drag the sound level line all the way back to the peak of a point of interest in this song (like the last mini-cut between the song's last and next to last loop or near where the drums dropped off or something similar).
    6.) Repeat this step for the beginning section of the next song. Dragging the sound level line to a similar point of interest in the beginning (like where the vocals start, for example).
    7.) Now it's time to overlap the two just a bit so that you get the best transition possible.
    i.) Radio-like overlapping is where you start the next track right as the other fades almost completely off. So that there is really no mixing of sound or beat matching to do (these are best for beginners and for stuff like podcasts).
    ii.) DJ megamix style overlapping is where you use smaller transitions by grouping the two songs closer together at the jump point. Just drag the first section of the second song back a little to where it's start can be heard while the other is still playing. Just use your eyes and ears to try and match the waveform spikes as closely as possible and/or just listen for the best possible blend (good for intermediates and for beefing up your current skill base at mixing/remixing).
    Mash-up mixing-)
    8.) Volume levels are essential! Start off your mix using 2 songs and later add a third or even a fourth- Keep the first 2 up at the lead and the others as backups. However, if you do add more remember to drop down the primary's volume by a little (between neg 1-5) and set the others a few behind that (neg 3-8). Though this can flip-flop back and forth throughout the mix if you want.
    8.) Beat matching comes next. This is where you'll begin to better understand the stereotypical "Boom-Tis-Boom-Tis" associated with Techno and Dance music. This is sometimes tricky the longer a section of song is. So it helps to sub-divide it down into smaller sections (kinda like loops).
    9.) Meloday match that sucker. Who cares if the beats are nailed solid if ya got keys goin crazy all over the place from one song to the other. Try to pair 'em up where they sound like they fit best. Even if the song's contrast one another greatly if it sounds natural then it'll seem right and it'll appear as if it's really just one song.
    (tip for both- as you are going through this part of the process and your ears/eyes start to get tired of all that concentrating. Sound isolate both songs to either channel. Like song one out left-only and song two out of the right. That way it becomes easier for your ears to pick up on whether the stuff is matching or if it's slightly off)
    10.) Keep 'em separated and leave gaps sometimes. It might be cool to be able to pair up 2 songs the entire time, but it stands to overwhelm the listener if they have such an overload for the whole song. Doing this also serves to create new lulls in the mix that weren't there on the original songs.
    11.) Play with the positioning. Don't have both/all songs playing in stereo for the whole mix. Sometimes it's nice (and refreshing) to hear stuff coming out of just the left side (for example, at one part play song 1 out of both while changing song 2 to just come out the right). By doing this back to back or interchanged it creates a cool little effect/illusion of spinning (eg, song 1 center for 6 and song 2 is left, center, right, center, left, center).
    12.) Sprinkle in effects here and there. While one song is playing regular/uneffected add some gated reverb to the other for one portion of the song, for example. Experiment with it and try adding the same kind of effect to both songs near a fade or transition point.
    13.) Throw in some of your own stuff for that extra touch of finesse. A random vocal sample or some sweet bass riff you've been working on, whatever. It doesn't really matter and isn't necessary, but it does add some pizazz to the finished product.
    14.) If ya do it, do it big, baby! Yep, don't hold back or be afraid of breaking the 10 min mark. 20, 30, and so on. Try to go as long as you can using what you've got so far. Less is best afterall, but try not to flirt with monotony like I sometimes do.
    -

    If I have time tomorrow I'll be doing a tutorial of this and posting it to YouTube. Well all, I needta head to bed now. Catch yall tomorrow!

    PV/TC,
    DV.

    PS. I forgot to mention- Direction
    change also gives the illusion of
    live spinning (if your program has a
    reverse or directional option, that is).
    Play a loop or section regular then
    reverse it up next.
  14. 158799
    alividlife : Wed 14th Jan 2009 : 9 years ago . this thread is the best..

    I wanted to interject something me and sv chatted.. or.. lol.. he told me..

    is
    """"

    1. Bad mixed music can still be mastered.

    2. Bad mixed music will still sound good and bad, after it's mastered. Bad (clipping, rumble, excess of freq), Good (balanced in freqs, stereo enhanced, compressed, expanded, and EQd - will sound "pretty" nice).

    3. this is the descovery - I should not try to master a badly mixed track, no matter how Good (from point 2) the outcome is or can be.

    """"

    Amen To that. I think the best idea is to try and keep levels from hurting your ears, but maxing them them to the max.

    Mastering is funner then making music for me personally, I feel a lot of joy hearing a dead drum beat becoming full and loud. Or a nuance in a guitar become integrated into the synth and etc. etc...

    =======================================
    why do you even try list.

    1.
    Who do you really respect? Why?

    Ask yourself? Why do I like "whoever-artist-is"? What do they do?.... How do they do it?

    No ONE likes a clone, but GREAT GREAT artists learnt from others.
    (Hunter S. Thompson re-wrote entire novels to learn the style of another writer, and every F'CKING guitarist does it everyday.)
    LEARN NEW STUFF
    I would recommend really Looking thru a Spectral analyzer the song of which you OBSESS.

    Seriously. LISTEN TO THE SONG YOU LOVE---- RIGHT NOW. Thru the window media player (visualizations are spectral analyzers) or your DAW and watch what happens sonically.
    Accept everything and listen. Try and hear each part and match it visually.

    After you listen.. Why? WHY? do you love this song?
    You know what.
    COPY the IDEAL.

    2.
    Figure out how they did it.
    FIGURE OUT HOW THEY DID IT. Via internet or by trial and error. ( I think this is really fun )
    Listen for the Compression... Listen for the Delay.. Listen at the changes.

    LISTEN...

    WHY DOES COMPRESSION WORK? Why does delay help?
    or
    How does delay hurt this..? How is reverb making this sound fake?
    Do what they did, but what you hear...

    But is it any good?? SERIOUSLY... Listen some more and then compare. STRAIGHT UP. Compare your mixes with the stuff you hear that is signed or what you want or whatever....

    4.
    Get some friends to hang out with you, and listen or jam out with you.
    Get some people here to hear you out.

    5.
    Get F*cjing crazy and just DO what you want.


    IF YOU HAVE ANY OPTION OF WATCHING A PRODUCER/DJ, WATCH THEM.

    In fact, for a funny fun fact. in the pacific northwest, a friend of mine and i, have dressed up, and then gotten cards, and full persona's, and walked into clubs. Straight up, as indie-pendant arists (lol) we have almost signed artists on major labels and gotten bottle service all night.

    Don't do it tho.. It ends badly.
    Trying to impress others or ... you know what..I really think this is an EPIC thing to state... NEVER try and BEAT somebody. Never LIE. If you do, and you actually beat somebody, or fool somebody, you will ultimately lose WAYYYY more than you gain.

    Giving is where you learn the most. You can be a strong musician, ... selfish, and catchy, and.... dare i say, pop... but DO NOT f8ck people over.
    You only hurt yourself (most of the time)
  15. 631823
    Mahloo13 : Wed 14th Jan 2009 : 9 years ago Just as alividlife said mastering it's the funniest but also the hardest process in creating a good balanced track.

    The most important thing is to visualize(picture) sound and then tryin' to recreate that visual image and when i say visualize i mean you should see in your mind where will the instruments stand in your mix and think how to recreate that space using panning for left and right placement and reeverb to give it depth( with reeverb you can also widen your mix meaning left and right).

    Always keep in mynd that every instrument, synth, vocal track has some freq characteristics that u must analyze. Make sure that never and i mean never 2 or more instrument have to fight for the same freq range in the mix and yes this is about eq.
    For example you have a guitar( electric) and a vocal track and it seems that the vocal does not come thru the mix and is buried in the guitars sound. So what do you do? Raise the vocals volume thus taking it over 0db? No! Never raise a synths or a instruments volume to make it clear in the mix. Ok for the example above you just have to eq the guitar cuttin' some dB beetween 2.5 kHz and 3.5 kHz and you will realize that the vocals still sound good and the guitar sound even better as if it would be a part of the vocal itself. Of course in every mix the guitar will sound diferent the vocals will be different so try and find that spot where they overlap. Remember in a track that has vocals be carefull on how much you edit the vocals cause they are the most important part in a song.

    TIP

    So you just recorded a good vocal track. try this: copy the vocals onto a separate mixer track the main vocals should be compressed not to much ( max 3dB in reduction will do it) and send only the second track uncompressed track to a reeverb unit thus making the reeverb heard only when the vocals start gettin' loud. The fact with havin a reeverb unit on the main vocals is that when you get loud and sing loud you won't understand a damn thing u will just hear the reeverb bouncin left and right and back again well that is unlles you you want that:))

    Ok i've saw a post on gettin that vintage warm sound. Well it's pretty hard because that sound comes from the Tape Machines that they used then and those well.... they apllied compression a warm compresion on the sound. That is the way they obtained that sound intentionally distortin' the sound so just try adding a bit(very small amount) distorsion on your mastered, eq-ed, and finished song and then pass it thru a compressor ( the toughest thing to do).
    It's a tough one because in digital world once you have passed 0dB (which is very loud) your mix is over( if you analize a track that is passing 0dB u will notice that the waveform won't be a sinus anymore and some small teeth apear, yeah digital distorsion) You can even blow your speakers with this technic but don't try it.
    Hope this helps!
  16. 165165
    Falter : Wed 14th Jan 2009 : 9 years ago I'm so damn glad i started this thread! I'm learning so much!!!!!! im just gonna take a day and run through each tip in here. that's gotta work some serious magic on the production knowledge.

    Anyway, something new.

    These are just general ideas that will help tracks become a lot more complete, though these may be obvious they should still be stated as a reminder.

    1.
    Not everything in a track needs to repeat!

    i see this all the time. a good solid foundation of a track with nothing extra, no single shot effects or random manipulation of filters etc.
    these things all give a track a lot more dimension and make it a less linear audio adventure (lol?)
    After you have finished your track, for example, go back to transitions and when a beat drops or something drop a heavy effect to punctuate it! it creates a much more emotional song and will make listeners more involved.
    so if you are a new guy this is especially for you, dont get into the habit of repetition being the only choice in a song. those irregularities make it fun.
    (BUT DON'T GO OVERBOARD AND HAVE A SOUND SIMILAR TO A SPACE BATTLE RUNNING BEHIND YOUR TRACK!)[Unless you want to?]


    2.
    Transitions Transitions Transitions

    These are a huge part of the flow of your song and have to carry the energy from one section to another. So dont skimp on them!
    Take your time and make sure it all blends. a badly timed drop or a quick beat transition that hasnt been blended properly can put a listener off. so take your time. make sure its a fluid motion because songs HAVE to flow well. doesnt matter what type of music you make. even Glitch and stuff have to have smoothed out transitions.


    3.
    TAKE YOUR TIME!!!

    If you want professional sound take professional time.

    attention to detail is a must.
    dont settle with an 'okay' sound or melody. tweak it til you are truly satisfied. it makes a world of difference. just running through a song quickly will teach you a lot less than a methodical approach in which you make everything as good as possible.


    4.
    THINK OUTSIDE THE BOX

    i want you to do something as a challenge to yourself.

    In every new track you compose i want you to integrate a new effect or plugin that you havent used before. do something that hard way instead of taking the easy answer and your knowledge of your DAW and of production in general will increase dramatically.

    once you are able to think of a sound you want and instantly have some idea of how to achieve it then you can really start your production in full.

    -------

    I said these would be obvious things.
    But they should be repeated every once in a while.

    So please please please push yourselves to give it that little bit extra and you will see improvements immediately.

    Peace guys n gals,
    Falter
  17. 631823
    Mahloo13 : Wed 14th Jan 2009 : 9 years ago Just uploaded some drum tracks on my profile one that hasn't been modified at all except the general setings that i've posted above and the second one has some effects and eq tips that i'll expose tomorrow in this thread. Ok The clean one has just a dat/cd de emphasis and a compressor to even the sound.....mhm the second one has the same but betwen those there is something else along with reeverb and some eq. Ok gotta go. Posting tomorrow. Just take a listen 'em and drop your opinion. Cheers!
  18. 165165
    Falter : Thu 15th Jan 2009 : 9 years ago BENASSI STYLE SYNTH
    (VERY VERSATILE, WIDE RANGE OF SOUNDS)

    Okay this is for anyone who listened to my new track and asked about that crazy synth. i starte off wanting to make a benassi style synth cus they are so damn pliable. you can slide em, gate em, it all sounds sick. If you have no idea what i'm talking about then heres my track link. it's this synth.

    https://www.looperman.com/tracks/detail/21140

    here goes,

    [NOTE: AS THE STEPS PROGRESS THE SYNTH BECOMES THICKER AND HARDER. SO RUN IT THROUGH TO THE END, BUT IF YOU LIKE THE SOUND AT A CERTAIN STAGE REMEMBER WHICH IT IS.]

    1.
    Open a 3xOsc (for FL, or something similar. doesnt matter if its just a double or single, you can make it work.)

    2.
    If you are using FL or a Triple Osc synth turn the last two oscillators off. (mute them)

    3.
    Change the wave type to a sharp saw one (i dont know the names of anything, but its the one that looks like a sideways Z lol)

    4.
    You should be left with a sound that is like a supermario bro's theme song note when you play it at C5. but. DROP IT LIKE ITS HOT. down to like C3 or half between C3 and C4. (you can play with it later this is just an example of what i do with it) It should now sound pretty rough. make a simple 4 to 4 pattern. make some variations whatever.

    5.
    go to your mixer and open an EQ. remove the very top end and the bottom end (far left and far right) and change the spacing to whatever sounds half decent to you. (you will come back later so dont worry too much)

    6.
    Now add a Delay effect after the EQ. Drop the time to 0:01. this will thicken it out a fair bit and add some tone.

    7.
    Now add some Reverb. tweak it to wherever you like but i kept the timing on mine short, a bit longer than the delay but still short.

    8.
    add ANOTHER Delay. Set this one to :05 or leave it a little longer, just go by ear. (THIS EFFECT IS ONE OF YOUR MAIN POINTS AT WHICH YOU CAN PLAY WITH THE SOUND FOR LOADS OF RESULTS, BUT FROM :05 TO A LITTLE OVER 1:00 IS THE SWEET SPOT! =P)

    9.
    Now, if the synth you have isnt hard and raw enough for you yet (which it probably will be unless you are making hard dance), add a compressor after you drop the volume a bit. (My Settings : Compression Type = Hard, Gain = 15 Db)

    10.
    [For FL Users]
    Slap on a soundgoodizer to even out the rough spots.
    [Everyone Else]
    I have no idea, but a nice filter may work some magic.

    ---------

    There it is.
    If you have any questions contact me via my page as to save room on this thread. i'm happy to help as im sure i prob left something out lol.

    Take it easy,
    TJ
  19. 165165
    Falter : Thu 15th Jan 2009 : 9 years ago FORGOT TO ADD!!!!!

    Those other two oscillators (or however many you have left.)
    keep them at about half the volume of the first, change the wave type to sine or something, and tweak the pitch. this will give you a little hum in the background opening up even more possibilities lol.

    Due to the amount of adjustable knobs and etc that go into this synth you can manipulate the hell out of it!

    Have Fun!
    TJ
  20. 631823
    Mahloo13 : Fri 16th Jan 2009 : 9 years ago Later than i said but here are the eq settings for the drums track i've uploaded on my profile

    Kick +2dB bellow 80hz; -6dB at 450hz; +2dB at 5kHz; +3.5dB at 7.5kHz
    Snare cut bellow 150Hz; +2.5dB at 230Hz; above 4kHz eq to taste depending on the sound you want and the type of vocals you have on the track
    HiHats cut bellow 350Hz; -1.5dB at 2,5kHz; above 7kHz eq to your taste
    Cymbals cut bellow 500Hz; -1dB at 2,5kHz; +1,5dB above 12kHz
    Crash same as cymbals except the fact u cut bellow 250Hz and boost 2dB above 12kHz
    Toms same as kick drum but cut below 150hZ and above 2,5kHz eq to your taste depending on the snap you want on your toms
    Rides same as cymbals

    The whole set +2dB bellow 60Hz; -3dB at 400Hz; +1db above 14kHz


    I have posted the general dB levels and panning settings on each individual kit piece in an earlier post.

    Ok the effects:
    The reeverb unit has a custom small drum room type setting

    Snare 15% to reeverb unit
    High tom 35% to reeverb unit
    Mid tom 15% to reeverb unit
    Low tom 35% to reeverb unit

    I've sent the whole kit to another reeverb unit and cut everything bellow 250Hz to create the ambiance

    On the master drums track i've a compressor a soft type cause the track was pretty balanced and a multiband compressor boosting a bit the lower end, comp the low mids and mids and a small boost on the high end (4 band compressor)

    I also used as an eq on the master channel of the mix a parametric eq with a cd de/pre-emphasis setting(just a 30 band stereo eq on which i lower the levels off the high end of the mix) that is a trick i do so that when i play my tracks on another system or in a car the highs won't go crazy on me cause almost everyone uses that V style eq(full bass and treble thing on winamp) when they listen to somethin'.

    Hope this helps!
  21. 631823
    Mahloo13 : Sat 17th Jan 2009 : 9 years ago Ok i've heard a lot of pellas havin' the background vocals panned left or right. STOP doin' that people! The vocals are the heart of the song and when you listen to a track and sudenly another vocal apear from left or right you say "eeehhh what was that' my speakers died?". Please dry not to do this anymore, instead try inserting another copy of the backing vox and pan one to the left and the other to the right ading effects afterwards or you could just leave it in the center and use a diferent eq setting in most cases some high end cut will do along with some low cut below 300hz just to give it another colour to make it obvious that there is another voice there. You see when the vocals ain't in the center well it kinda moves the weight of the song to one of the sides.
    Hope this helps someone!

    Good Luck!
    Malu
  22. 182704
    Chud37 : Fri 6th Feb 2009 : 9 years ago Hmm..

    I really dont agree with exporting as a wave and manuelly fiddling with the volume, I use a limiter and a multiband compresser on my main track (this is in cubase) and what im starting to do is split my song up into sections, i.e. drums and synths and samples. Each section then has its own multiband compression on it.

    I would like to try others. I dont completly understand what a multiband compressor does, but i just test it out in the different frequencies to find one that works.

    This isnt really a mastering technique, but i would reccommend a MIDI keyboard, even if you cant play piano, you'll soon learn some basics that'll get you by. But it helps so much with finding good rythms and patterns and stuff. Also if you know the MIDI Controller table you can assign the knobs on the MIDI keyboard to the different controllers, like i could change the cutoff in my synth physically with one of the assigned knobs on the keyboard. It really is alot more fun than using a mouse and when i first got my keyboard i sat there for ages just creating the most insane sounds.

    But i agree with layering also. I like to put strings in and octaves higher, with just the odd note plucked out from the main synth, and layering oscillators over one another inside the synth really helps too to get that bassy sound. Use different filters inside the synth aswell, sometimes just using one can make it too white-noisy-like.

    Above all the limiter and the multi band compression is the main thing. Im looking for ways to improve it further and if i find a good compression VST i will let you know. But i went back and redid my songs with the limiter and compressor on the master, and the results were amazing. First of all it was so much louder, and the my old version compared to the new sound muffled and really far away. The compressor brung it all forward, so clear that you can hear perfectly the individual hi-hats very neatly in such a loud song. (That song was Poi Ramekins by the way).

    Delays on samples work well too, but there is a tendancy to put a delay on everything. Like reverb, people use it far to much sometime and it ruins a song. I used to love reverb by i try to use it sparsly nowadays. I've heard the perfect delay for 140 bpm is .320ms. It is actually rather a nice speed.

    Hope this helps :P
  23. 182704
    Chud37 : Fri 6th Feb 2009 : 9 years ago Hmm..

    I really dont agree with exporting as a wave and manuelly fiddling with the volume, I use a limiter and a multiband compresser on my main track (this is in cubase) and what im starting to do is split my song up into sections, i.e. drums and synths and samples. Each section then has its own multiband compression on it.

    I would like to try others. I dont completly understand what a multiband compressor does, but i just test it out in the different frequencies to find one that works.

    This isnt really a mastering technique, but i would reccommend a MIDI keyboard, even if you cant play piano, you'll soon learn some basics that'll get you by. But it helps so much with finding good rythms and patterns and stuff. Also if you know the MIDI Controller table you can assign the knobs on the MIDI keyboard to the different controllers, like i could change the cutoff in my synth physically with one of the assigned knobs on the keyboard. It really is alot more fun than using a mouse and when i first got my keyboard i sat there for ages just creating the most insane sounds.

    But i agree with layering also. I like to put strings in and octaves higher, with just the odd note plucked out from the main synth, and layering oscillators over one another inside the synth really helps too to get that bassy sound. Use different filters inside the synth aswell, sometimes just using one can make it too white-noisy-like.

    Above all the limiter and the multi band compression is the main thing. Im looking for ways to improve it further and if i find a good compression VST i will let you know. But i went back and redid my songs with the limiter and compressor on the master, and the results were amazing. First of all it was so much louder, and the my old version compared to the new sound muffled and really far away. The compressor brung it all forward, so clear that you can hear perfectly the individual hi-hats very neatly in such a loud song. (That song was Poi Ramekins by the way).

    Delays on samples work well too, but there is a tendancy to put a delay on everything. Like reverb, people use it far to much sometime and it ruins a song. I used to love reverb by i try to use it sparsly nowadays. I've heard the perfect delay for 140 bpm is .320ms. It is actually rather a nice speed.

    Hope this helps :P
  24. 182704
    Chud37 : Fri 6th Feb 2009 : 9 years ago argh i didnt mean to post twice... now i've posted three times.. im sorry :S lol
  25. 631823
    Mahloo13 : Sat 7th Feb 2009 : 9 years ago Yes Chud it is a nice speed and you know why because it goes exactly with the hihats...let's say you have a kick drum....ok i'll do it this way
    X means kick
    o means hihats
    W means delay
    _ means pause
    x _ _ _ x _ _ _ x _ _ _ x _ _ _
    O O O O O O O O
    W W W W
    W (the Delay's first sound comes on every second hihat) thus creating a nice sync and keeping the rythm intact. Don't believe me try it.
    This example is for the 140 bpm speed.

    -Malu-
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