See our Outer Space RE-201 emulator By AudioThing Review

Music Theory 101

Posts 1 - 25 of 25
  1. 610521
    SamAndHisGuitar : Wed 12th Jun 2013 : 8 years ago

    I'm a college graduate in Music Theory with a focus on classical guitar. I have won two awards in my respective field in state competitions. I would love to help out any willing Looper's to learn some theory, or anything else about the project they are working on, etc. Just let me know, and I will answer it as soon as I can get to a computer. Cheers.

  2. 828980
    Burtsbluesboxes : Wed 12th Jun 2013 : 8 years ago

    Hi Sam i'm studying theory on my own been at it about a year now, any questions i have i wont hesitate to ask u, thank you for this thread!

  3. 610521
    SamAndHisGuitar : Wed 12th Jun 2013 : 8 years ago

    Good to go man! Anything at all you can think of. Chord relations to modes.

  4. 828980
    Burtsbluesboxes : Wed 12th Jun 2013 : 8 years ago

    Hey Sam can you explain modes a little? I got a basic understanding of keys, chord progressions.

  5. 610521
    SamAndHisGuitar : Wed 12th Jun 2013 : 8 years ago

    Absolutely! Let's talk modes. First off, let's go over what modes are: Think of a piano. You have middle C. Now. All scales played consecutively on white keys (no raised or lowered notes) are mode constructs used in the old time church music. So, C, D, E, F, G, A, B, on the keyboard is in fact Ionian mode, or more commonly known as the major scale! That is where our major scale was derived from. And this is how they relate in steps from the first note of the scale.

    Ionian - Ionian is the major scale in itself. So:
    Whole, Whole, Half, Whole, Whole, Whole, Half

    Dorian - The second mode. Second note of the major scale.
    Whole, Half, Whole, Whole, Whole, Half, Whole

    Phrygian - Constructed from the third note of a major scale.
    Half, Whole, Whole, Whole, Half, Whole, Whole

    Lydian - Constructed from the fourth note of a major scale. Whole, Whole, Whole, Half, Whole, Whole, Half.
    (Very beautiful mode. See Alter Bridge - Down To My Last)

    Mixolydian - Constructed from the fifth note of a major scale. Whole, Whole, Half, Whole, Whole, Half, Whole.

    Aeolian - This is your traditional minor scale. It is constructed from the sixth note of a major scale.
    Whole, Half, Whole, Whole, Half, Whole, Whole.

    Locrian - Constructed from the seventh note of a major scale. Half, Whole, Whole, Half, Whole, Whole, Whole
    (Very odd sounding and dissonant mode, see my song Releasing The Albatross for the Locrian mode, and others.)

    Modes can be complex to first learn, however, once learned, they open up an entire new approach to music. Modes also sound best with certain chords. Example -

    Ionian - Major 7th chords

    Dorian - Minor 7th chords

    Phrygian - Flat Ninth and Sixth

    Lydian - Major 7th (the sharp fourth leaves a beautiful sound in the scale in relation), Dominant 7th (Flat-7th note in scale)

    Aeolian - Generic Minor Chord

    Locrian - Flat 5ths (Very Dissonant in relation to the rest of the scale)

    I hope that helps!

  6. 828980
    Burtsbluesboxes : Wed 12th Jun 2013 : 8 years ago

    Thank you!! that makes perfect sense to me! I am studying from a book, and watching videos online and now asking you questions.

  7. 828980
    Burtsbluesboxes : Wed 12th Jun 2013 : 8 years ago

    So just to clarify for myself, the modes are just different names for the scales? Major, harmonic minor, melodic minor ect.

  8. 208341
    drmistersir : Wed 12th Jun 2013 : 8 years ago

    what's the low down on diminished and enegmatic

    i only know i like em

  9. 610521
    SamAndHisGuitar : Wed 12th Jun 2013 : 8 years ago

    phatkatz4, modes are not traditional scales. Ionian is the major scale, and Aeolian is the minor scale, however, each mode is it's own scale variant. Combining modes to traditional music produces a very novel approach. It breaks you free from the 7 notes in your scale, and gives you 4 more new ones to play with.

    drmistersir, traditionally, scales consists of modes, and regular scales, major and minor. Any other scales are called 'exotic scales' harmonic minor, melodic minor, diminished, etc. enigmatic falls under an 'exotic scale'

    A diminished scale is simply a minor scale with a raised 7th. So, in A minor, you would have a G# instead of G natural.

    Enigmatic is very dissonant and chromatic towards the 6th and 7th notes. In fact, it steps out of whole and half steps, into 1.5 steps upon the second notes, or a minor third. Let's convert that to actual music to make it simpler. From C natural:

    C, Db, E, F#, G#, A#, B, and C again.

    It's a very elaborate scale. Almost Egyptian sounding.

    For you guitar tabbers -

    │-------------------------------│
    │-------------------------------│
    │-------------------------------│
    │-----------3-4-5-4-3-----------│
    │-----2-4-6-----------6-4-2-----│
    │-3-4-----------------------3-4-│
    │-------------------------------│

  10. 208341
    drmistersir : Wed 12th Jun 2013 : 8 years ago

    that was pretty helpful honestly

    i appreciate the tab too
    that stuff is my first language if you know what i mean

    i really wish i had another coherenet question to ask
    but... not yet

    thanks all the same

  11. 828980
    Burtsbluesboxes : Thu 13th Jun 2013 : 8 years ago

    Give me a day or two to absorb this great new knowledege, take some notes, and I'll have some more questions.Thank you very much for this!

  12. 828980
    Burtsbluesboxes : Thu 13th Jun 2013 : 8 years ago

    Hell, might as well keep you busy, can you talk about chord construction? all I studied on that so far is about the tetra chords. I know how to play plenty of them but don't understand the theory behind them yet.( i wrote down all you talked about so far)

  13. 610521
    SamAndHisGuitar : Thu 13th Jun 2013 : 8 years ago

    A tetrachord is essentially four notes of a chord spanning from the 1st to the 4th . Most of the time, tetrachords are what you hear running up and down the neck during quick progressions. Example in E minor (standard tuning) -

    │----------│------------│
    │----------│------------│
    │----------│------------│
    │--------7-│------------│
    │-7-9-10---│----9-10-12-│
    │----------│-12---------│

    It's the variations of the notes in relation to the guitar that make this perfect for guitarist. The guitar is tuned in fourths, and the tetrachord is built off of the 1st and 4th relation.

    Anything more specific you wanted to know about it?

  14. 828980
    Burtsbluesboxes : Thu 13th Jun 2013 : 8 years ago

    I know chords are constructed from scale notes, the names come from the root and notes raised or lowered give it the name major, minor, augmented, diminished, can explain some formulas for chord construction and a little about the names like diminished, augmented, ect. with the modes i see how the pattern basically repeats but shifted up a step each mode, where the first steps are shifted to the end

  15. 610521
    SamAndHisGuitar : Thu 13th Jun 2013 : 8 years ago

    Oh! You mean like Dsus4, and things like that? Absolutely! Those are altered chords, which can be secondary dominants or even borrowed chords depending on chord relation.

    Let's take a look at the main ones:

    Augmented - Augmented chords are major chords with a raised note, usually the 5th.

    This is Daug5

    │-2-│ Notice that the A natural is now A#.
    │-3-│ D, F, A triad is now, D, F, A#
    │-3-│ 1st 3rd 1st 3rd
    │-0-│ 2nd 2nd
    │---│
    │---│

    Diminished - A diminished chord is a minor chord with a flat note, usually the 5th.

    Here is Ddim5

    │-2-│
    │-3-│ Notice how this chord moves chromatically opposite
    │-1-│ or flat of the previous example. In this case, the
    │-0-│ A natural is flatted to Ab. (D, F, Ab)
    │---│
    │---│

    Suspended - Suspended chords are void of the stacked third, and usually have a perfect 4th to replace the 3rd. Ex. -

    Dsus4
    │-3-│
    │-3-│
    │-2-│
    │-0-│
    │---│
    │---│

    The traditional D chord has an F#. Essentially, it has been raised to form G natural. In this case though. To maintain triad form (D F A), the new chord triad is D, F double sharp, A.

    I hope that helps!

  16. 828980
    Burtsbluesboxes : Thu 13th Jun 2013 : 8 years ago

    All info helps! I just cant get enough!!

  17. 610521
    SamAndHisGuitar : Thu 13th Jun 2013 : 8 years ago

    Just let me know if you need more man.

  18. 828980
    Burtsbluesboxes : Thu 13th Jun 2013 : 8 years ago

    oh there's more you be teaching whole course by the time i'm done :) just trying get some projects wrapped up, then i'll plaster you with questions :0

  19. 231850
    Diskonnect : Tue 18th Jun 2013 : 8 years ago

    Can you explain the circle of fifths to me? never really got that one lol.

  20. 610521
    SamAndHisGuitar : Wed 19th Jun 2013 : 8 years ago

    The circle of fifths! The basis for all music notation and chord relations. This is a day 1 topic of any Music Theory class. Unless you understand the concept of sharp notes and flat notes, and why they are that way, then explaining will do little justice to the system. Essentially -

    C Major is the start.

    C-G-D-A-E-B-F#-Db-Ab-Eb-Bb-F then back to C.

    It is how from one note you can move using fifths to circle back.

    Musically speaking, it shows you how many sharps or flats are in each respective key.

    C has no sharps and no flats.

    G has an F#

    D has F# and C#.

    A has F# C# and G#

    E has F# C# G# and D#

    Etc.

    Think of scales.

    Also, the circle shows relative minors.

    Your major key's 6th note of scalar progression is it's relative minor. A C major scale will perfectly fit over an A minor chord and vice versa by this method.

  21. 208341
    drmistersir : Thu 20th Jun 2013 : 8 years ago

    got one!
    how would one relate eastern notation in western scales

    i mean those strange half-flats and odd scales they use in the near and far east
    i try to capture that stuff sometimes, and it's elusive at best... any insight would be useful

  22. 231850
    Diskonnect : Thu 20th Jun 2013 : 8 years ago

    Thanks for explaining it dude! I should have probably known it by now, but I've never really been too bothered with theory!

  23. 1037855
    PerfectInterval7 : Thu 7th Nov 2013 : 7 years ago

    An easy way to understand modes is to use the idea of displacement. If you think of a C Major scale -C-D-E-F-G-A-B-C

    If we start on D =D-E-F-G-A-B-C-D This is Dorian -
    E-F-G-A-B-C-D-E = Phrygian
    F-G-A-B-C-D-E-F = Lydian
    G-A-B-C-D-E-F-G = Mixolydian
    A-B-C-D-E-F-G-A = Aeolian
    B-C-D-E-F-G-A-B = Locrian

    So if we think of Dorian as displacement scale one -d1
    Phrygian d2
    Lydian d3
    Mixolydian d4
    Aeolian d5
    Locrian d6

    We can now find the modes starting from any Major Key.

    So for example -the Dorian Mode based on Eb -would be:

    F-G Ab-Bb-C-D-Eb-F

    This is a neat way of getting a profoundly deep understanding of modes. Write them all out -have fun with it.

  24. 557270
    Audiotism : Thu 7th Nov 2013 : 7 years ago

    If ya'll would tell me you were speaking chinese, I would believe you. Gibberish to me :] But nice to see you are helping people!

  25. 828980
    Burtsbluesboxes : Thu 7th Nov 2013 : 7 years ago

    LOL LOL! Audiotism it's actually quite simple once you start to understand a little, all the rest falls into place and makes complete sense :D This probably still wont make sense to you but take a C major scale C D E F G A B C look at your keyboard (Or any piano keyboard) you have black and white keys. The white are whole note names the black are sharps# an Flats b starting with C a whole step up is D whole step again E 1/2 step up is F the formula/pattern for any major scale is W W H W W W H

Posts 1 - 25 of 25

 ! You need to Log In or Register to post here.

From The Forums