Annoying Hiss/hum While Recording

Posts 1 - 22 of 22
  1. 170688
    StephanieKay : Mon 23rd Nov 2009 : 4 years ago Hey guys! I've recently invested in some better sounding, higher quality studio speakers. They sound great, but also I've been able to notice more issues in my recordings. All of my recording have an annoying hiss/hum in the background. I don't know what is causing it. I have a preamp, a very nice microphone (it is not a condenser so it is not background ambience it is picking up) If you listen to any of my acapellas you can hear what i'm talking about. I have a cover/net like thing (sorry, don't know what the proper term is) over my microphone to help eliminate clipping and too much breath, and the microphone is not close to the speakers. If anybody could shed some light on this, I would be estatic! If you need system specs let me know
  2. 93125
    Unknown User : Mon 23rd Nov 2009 : 4 years ago check the cord.....a nice cord can auctually be an essential part of your equipment
  3. 158799
    alividlife : Mon 23rd Nov 2009 : 4 years ago yeah that's probably your best bet
    check the cable as Epic said..
    just to divulge more info, the soldering inside the cable can tend to be "cold soldered" and eventially get brittle and lose a stable connection...

    Other thoughts, is keeping your mic away from flourescent lights or your computer monitor, but that as well is usually a "ground issue"...

    Finally, make sure your pre-amp, and your computer are plugged into and from the same power source.... and that it's properly grounded too...

    buzz is usually the case with grounds..
    hiss could also be your fans, or damn near anything electrical in your "recording" area...
    try unplugging anything you don't need and see if something isn't adding any high frequency buzz or whatever?

    hope you get it figured out!
  4. 631823
    Mahloo13 : Mon 23rd Nov 2009 : 4 years ago With one hand grab the mic and with the other touch the metal case of your PC...and tell me did it stop buzzing?

    If it stops it means you sockets(or whatever there called...the things you plug your electrical equipment in) aren't correctly grounded.

    You should also plug the power cable of the monitors into a different socket and not in the same with the PC.

    Hope this helps!

    -Malu-
  5. 67443
    SLAPJOHNSON : Mon 23rd Nov 2009 : 4 years ago I have that sound in my ears at all times... Buzz / hiss...
    Oh dear... It's a bad sign..
    I hope you get your problem fixed.

    Cheers Slap...
  6. 631823
    Mahloo13 : Mon 23rd Nov 2009 : 4 years ago How exactly do you connect the mic to the PC?

    As far as the problem goes after listening to your pellas it seems that your problem is the so called "hiss"...it may be from different cause like Signal to Noise ratios from the different types of gears your using the Preamp, the mic and your sound card all have a noise floor and from what i've heard i believe that is your problem.

    Some technical data would help like the models of your mic, preamp and sound card.

    -Malu-
  7. 158799
    alividlife : Mon 23rd Nov 2009 : 4 years ago @Mahloo13

    I thought the right way to power up the audio monitors and the computer was on THE same power current?

    Have I been misinformed??
  8. 223506
    siensystem : Tue 24th Nov 2009 : 4 years ago It is a bit difficult to determine what can be the issue since it can be a multitude of scenarios. It depends on a variety of cases. Do you have a mixer? What is your setup?

    I'd suggest you check your gain on the preamp; you may have the gain up significantly or at full at the pre-amp level but low at the software level thus getting noise from the pre-amp itself.

    Also to consider is if you have other things connected; if so, turn off the things you are not using since each contributes some level of noise.

    Hope that you can resolve it, please let us know the outcome.
  9. 631823
    Mahloo13 : Tue 24th Nov 2009 : 4 years ago @ Alividlife - Never power them from the same outlet...always connect your monitors power cable to a different outlet.
  10. 170688
    StephanieKay : Wed 25th Nov 2009 : 4 years ago The microphone is connected in the back of the preamp, which is connected in the back of my computer by usb. I do not hear the hiss during recording, only in the recording itself. so it is not something that is making noise in my studio, it has got to be something electrical or something I'm doing wrong in terms of wiring, etc. grrr "/
  11. 631823
    Mahloo13 : Wed 25th Nov 2009 : 4 years ago Is that a dynamic microphone or a condenser one?
  12. 170688
    StephanieKay : Fri 27th Nov 2009 : 4 years ago it's not a condenser so it must be dynamic. My dad set everything up for me but he yelled at me and told me to be careful because this microphone was really expensive..so idk? i just want the dumb noise to go away
  13. 605220
    Ensam : Fri 27th Nov 2009 : 4 years ago check you haven't got power cables crossing or coming into contact with signal cables and a tip is, any excess cable you have laying around, coil it up neatly as it helps to cancel noise. Sometimes the simple things, but more often than not it is caused by earth loops which is not something that can be fixed in a home environment.

    Simon
  14. 345193
    Kirsti101 : Fri 15th Jan 2010 : 4 years ago Hi,I was looking over your post thought I'd add a little extra info.

    This hiss can be created from cables you should stay with a Digital connection.
    It could also be your computers sound card.
    If it's using the built in MOB sound this is most likely,if it's a third party card such as a Soundblaster it will have this hiss as well.
    So if you have addressed the other remedies perhapes investing in a better sound card(PCI if your computer has the slot for it).
    Make sure the sound card has a low latency.
  15. 79125
    Unknown User : Fri 5th Feb 2010 : 4 years ago hey all, i am trying to jump on a thread that has a similiar nature, as i am experiencing some hissing. more of a ringing and some distotion. Like a scratchy sounding feedback.

    I record with a condensor mic into a mixer, runnin preamp power. This noise is not like a normal interference noise. that usually is bearable, this noise is hurting my ears.

    I do not have anything else pludded into the outlet that the mixer is powered off. is my mic cable shot? how would i know. w/o buying a new one. all seems good on my mixer, at first i thought it was some crazy modeling effect on it. but i wish i was that lucky....

    i removed the end of the plug, all connections, soddering and what not seem ok. but i really dont know what i am looking for. i weird that outta nowhere its so bad i cant even do voxs over it. any one a lil more tech savvy with the equip have any idea, or trouble shooting procedures?
  16. 308224
    theHumps : Fri 5th Feb 2010 : 4 years ago Maybe it's the mixer. Do you have any other way to connect the same mic and cord thru another interface or mixer then into your computer? If you can do that and it doesn't make that noise then it's prob the mixer.

    You could use a multitester to check for continuity or shorts from pin to pin, pin to shield...

    Try another cord. Just a process of elimination, I guess.

    Wayne
  17. 79125
    Unknown User : Fri 5th Feb 2010 : 4 years ago i am thinking the mixer is alright, but i have no other place to test the input. and i have to get another cord, probably purchase, to check that. But the mixer is sounding fine for all oher purposes. i could try to input something other than a mic jack, but i am 99% sure the sound is only on the mic.
  18. 220346
    Peres : Fri 5th Feb 2010 : 4 years ago As Epic said Steph check the cord,if it's not feedback that is the only other thing it could be. Although I had a similar sound on my set up and found it was the built in mic on the webcam causing this ,I disabled it and hey presto problem sorted!
  19. 79125
    Unknown User : Fri 5th Feb 2010 : 4 years ago ill have to try the multi tester out.
  20. 82787
    denialart : Sat 13th Feb 2010 : 4 years ago try an EMF finder thingy.or try 2 set your speakers 2 phase reverse,basicly change the speakers connection.set 1 up normally,then witth the other change the left 2 right,and the right 2 left.maybe set the mic a distance from your speakers,or at an angle.i find this works 4 me.the EMF is to find electrical interference,my guitar efx does this a lot.
  21. 200966
    skandalouz : Mon 15th Feb 2010 : 4 years ago talking about hiss on tracks, the easiest thing to do is obviously a hiss reduction but that tends to reduce the quality of the recording n u will all know if u do 2 verses n then adlibs it can build up a lot of noise, what i tend to do is hav the mic on a low/medium volume and normalise the recording cutting it at each end, another usefull tip is normalise silent parts that u cant cut to zero, small things like a good dynamics processing setting is essential plus a small reverb helps out too, see what you think of what i did
  22. 209373
    KIESERSAUCER : Mon 15th Feb 2010 : 4 years ago Make sure your inputs are grounded that's usually the case.
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